Title

Public Humanities, Early American Studies, and the Digital Revolution

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Walls Lounge

Session

#s2a: Re-Envisioning and Reclaiming History, moderator Mark Sheftall

Start Date

29-10-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

29-10-2017 12:00 PM

Description

Can the digital turn in humanities scholarship produce more fruitful engagements between post-secondary institutions and the many publics that exist outside the academy? To engage this and related questions, this presentation will focus on Mapping Colonial American Publishing (http://cds.library.brown.edu/mapping-genres/), a collaborative project that uses library catalog data from two of Brown’s rare book libraries to visualize the history of publishing in the Americas before 1800. Our recent efforts at engaging audiences beyond the academy has produced as many questions as answers. We’ve wondered, for instance, what topics might draw readers to a subject that often draws more yawns than clicks, and how we might we use the digital to connect with the world outside the academy through partnerships with local historic sites, coordinating with museums and local public humanities groups, for instance, and/or elementary, middle, and/or secondary schools in order to advance the goals of all communities involved?

Related

Language

eng

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Oct 29th, 10:30 AM Oct 29th, 12:00 PM

Public Humanities, Early American Studies, and the Digital Revolution

Elaine Langone Center, Walls Lounge

Can the digital turn in humanities scholarship produce more fruitful engagements between post-secondary institutions and the many publics that exist outside the academy? To engage this and related questions, this presentation will focus on Mapping Colonial American Publishing (http://cds.library.brown.edu/mapping-genres/), a collaborative project that uses library catalog data from two of Brown’s rare book libraries to visualize the history of publishing in the Americas before 1800. Our recent efforts at engaging audiences beyond the academy has produced as many questions as answers. We’ve wondered, for instance, what topics might draw readers to a subject that often draws more yawns than clicks, and how we might we use the digital to connect with the world outside the academy through partnerships with local historic sites, coordinating with museums and local public humanities groups, for instance, and/or elementary, middle, and/or secondary schools in order to advance the goals of all communities involved?