Title

The re-introduction of the American Eel to the Upper Susquehanna Watershed

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone, Room 241

Session

Aquatic Ecosystems

Start Date

27-10-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

27-10-2018 2:30 PM

Keywords

Susquehanna River, freshwater mussels, freshwater eels, eastern elliptio mussel, American eel, environmental monitoring, dams

Description

Dams across the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and New York currently prevent American eels from returning to this watershed, where they were once a significant part of river, stream, and lake fauna (Dittman et al., 2009: 2010). With the loss of American eels, other impacts to our local ecosystems are apparent. These include the loss of the sole effective host of our historically most numerous riverine pearly mussel – The Eastern Elliptio (Minkkinen et al., 2010; Lellis et al., 2013) – and the irruption of the invasive crayfish: the rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) (Kuhlman & Hazelton, 2007; Kuhlmann, 2016). Rusty Crayfish densities have apparent negative consequences to at least one pearly mussel species of greatest conservation need (SGCN), the yellow lampmussel (Lampsilis cariosa) (Lord, personal observation). We propose to initiate a full evaluation of American eel and ecosystem impacts following their reintroduction. Dittman, D. E., L. S. Machut, J. H. Johnson. 2009. American eel history, status and management options: Susquehanna River drainage. Comprehensive study of the American eel for NYSDEC by Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science, USGS, Great Lakes Science Center, Cortland, NY 13045. Dittman, D. E., L. S. Machut, J. H. Johnson. 2010. American eels: Data assimilation and management options for New York inland waters. Comprehensive study of the American eel for NYSDEC by Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science, USGS, Great Lakes Science Center, Cortland, NY 13045. Kuhlmann, M. L., and P. D. Hazelton. 2007. Invasion of the upper Susquehanna River watershed by rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus. Northeastern Naturalist.14:507-518. Lellis, W. A., B. S. White, J.C. Cole, C. S. Johnson, E.V.S. Gray, H. S. Galbraith and J. L. Devers. 2013. Newly documented host fishes for Eastern Elliptio Mussel Elliptio complanata. Journal of Fish & Wildlife Management 4:75–85.

Language

eng

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Oct 27th, 1:30 PM Oct 27th, 2:30 PM

The re-introduction of the American Eel to the Upper Susquehanna Watershed

Elaine Langone, Room 241

Dams across the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania and New York currently prevent American eels from returning to this watershed, where they were once a significant part of river, stream, and lake fauna (Dittman et al., 2009: 2010). With the loss of American eels, other impacts to our local ecosystems are apparent. These include the loss of the sole effective host of our historically most numerous riverine pearly mussel – The Eastern Elliptio (Minkkinen et al., 2010; Lellis et al., 2013) – and the irruption of the invasive crayfish: the rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) (Kuhlman & Hazelton, 2007; Kuhlmann, 2016). Rusty Crayfish densities have apparent negative consequences to at least one pearly mussel species of greatest conservation need (SGCN), the yellow lampmussel (Lampsilis cariosa) (Lord, personal observation). We propose to initiate a full evaluation of American eel and ecosystem impacts following their reintroduction. Dittman, D. E., L. S. Machut, J. H. Johnson. 2009. American eel history, status and management options: Susquehanna River drainage. Comprehensive study of the American eel for NYSDEC by Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science, USGS, Great Lakes Science Center, Cortland, NY 13045. Dittman, D. E., L. S. Machut, J. H. Johnson. 2010. American eels: Data assimilation and management options for New York inland waters. Comprehensive study of the American eel for NYSDEC by Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science, USGS, Great Lakes Science Center, Cortland, NY 13045. Kuhlmann, M. L., and P. D. Hazelton. 2007. Invasion of the upper Susquehanna River watershed by rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus. Northeastern Naturalist.14:507-518. Lellis, W. A., B. S. White, J.C. Cole, C. S. Johnson, E.V.S. Gray, H. S. Galbraith and J. L. Devers. 2013. Newly documented host fishes for Eastern Elliptio Mussel Elliptio complanata. Journal of Fish & Wildlife Management 4:75–85.