Title

Fish enzyme activity in the Susquehanna River Basin: linkages to ecology, evolution and watershed stressors

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone, Room 243

Session

Aquatic Ecosystems

Start Date

27-10-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

27-10-2018 2:30 PM

Keywords

Susquehanna River, thiaminase, enzymes

Description

Thiaminase, an enzyme known to degrade vitamin B1 (thiamine), has been attributed to reproductive issues and physiological abnormalities in fish in the Great Lakes and Finger Lakes; however, the mechanisms driving thiaminase activity are not well understood. We measured thiaminase activity in 29 species of freshwater fish, predominantly from the Susquehanna River Basin. Each species was classified according to phylogeny, trophic mode, native or non-native status, and location of capture to evaluate potential factors corresponding to thiaminase activity. Thiaminase activity varied widely across phylogenies (species, families, broad phylogenetic groups), trophic factors, and capture locations. Thiaminase activity was lower in phylogenetically-primitive teleosts compared to those more derived, and higher among herbivorous fishes than carnivores and omnivores. Average site-specific thiaminase activity of one species, the spotfin shiner (Cyprinella spiloptera), corresponded to land use within the watershed, such that thiaminase activity positively correlated to the percentage of forest within the watershed, and inversely correlated with the percentages of high- and medium-intensity development and hay fields. These findings suggest that foraging traits, phylogeny, and watershed land use could be important drivers of the thiaminase status in freshwater fish. More studies are needed to explain interacting factors that influence variation in thiaminase activity, as well as their effects on the health of freshwater ecosystems.

Language

eng

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Oct 27th, 1:30 PM Oct 27th, 2:30 PM

Fish enzyme activity in the Susquehanna River Basin: linkages to ecology, evolution and watershed stressors

Elaine Langone, Room 243

Thiaminase, an enzyme known to degrade vitamin B1 (thiamine), has been attributed to reproductive issues and physiological abnormalities in fish in the Great Lakes and Finger Lakes; however, the mechanisms driving thiaminase activity are not well understood. We measured thiaminase activity in 29 species of freshwater fish, predominantly from the Susquehanna River Basin. Each species was classified according to phylogeny, trophic mode, native or non-native status, and location of capture to evaluate potential factors corresponding to thiaminase activity. Thiaminase activity varied widely across phylogenies (species, families, broad phylogenetic groups), trophic factors, and capture locations. Thiaminase activity was lower in phylogenetically-primitive teleosts compared to those more derived, and higher among herbivorous fishes than carnivores and omnivores. Average site-specific thiaminase activity of one species, the spotfin shiner (Cyprinella spiloptera), corresponded to land use within the watershed, such that thiaminase activity positively correlated to the percentage of forest within the watershed, and inversely correlated with the percentages of high- and medium-intensity development and hay fields. These findings suggest that foraging traits, phylogeny, and watershed land use could be important drivers of the thiaminase status in freshwater fish. More studies are needed to explain interacting factors that influence variation in thiaminase activity, as well as their effects on the health of freshwater ecosystems.