Title

Limnological Evaluation of Indian Park Pond

Item Type

Poster

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Session

Poster session

Start Date

26-10-2018 8:00 PM

End Date

26-10-2018 9:59 PM

Keywords

Indian Park Pond, trophic state, pond

Description

The Indian Park Pond is a 1.86-hectare (4.6 acre) man made pond located in Montoursville Borough, Lycoming County. The pond is actually a series four separate depressions. This 2018 study is a follow-up evaluation of the trophic state of the pond first completed in 2014. According to the Lake Assessment Protocol of the PADEP, the main concerns with water quality associated with Pennsylvania lakes deal with eutrophication, mainly cultural eutrophication caused by human activity. Interns from Lycoming College’s Clean Water Institute conducted tests to assess the pond’s trophic state and analyze the health of the pond. The Carlson’s Trophic Index was calculated based on total phosphorous, Chlorophyll-a, and Secchi disk depth indicates the pond to be in a hypereutrophic state. Additional data collected were fish diversity, macroinvertebrate diversity, macrophyte diversity, coliform bacteria, zooplankton and other chemical parameters. These data help by the Borough evaluate the recreational use of the pond. High coliforms due to large density of waterfowl, thick aquatic plant and low dissolved oxygen are all concerns for future maintenance and use.

Language

eng

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Oct 26th, 8:00 PM Oct 26th, 9:59 PM

Limnological Evaluation of Indian Park Pond

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

The Indian Park Pond is a 1.86-hectare (4.6 acre) man made pond located in Montoursville Borough, Lycoming County. The pond is actually a series four separate depressions. This 2018 study is a follow-up evaluation of the trophic state of the pond first completed in 2014. According to the Lake Assessment Protocol of the PADEP, the main concerns with water quality associated with Pennsylvania lakes deal with eutrophication, mainly cultural eutrophication caused by human activity. Interns from Lycoming College’s Clean Water Institute conducted tests to assess the pond’s trophic state and analyze the health of the pond. The Carlson’s Trophic Index was calculated based on total phosphorous, Chlorophyll-a, and Secchi disk depth indicates the pond to be in a hypereutrophic state. Additional data collected were fish diversity, macroinvertebrate diversity, macrophyte diversity, coliform bacteria, zooplankton and other chemical parameters. These data help by the Borough evaluate the recreational use of the pond. High coliforms due to large density of waterfowl, thick aquatic plant and low dissolved oxygen are all concerns for future maintenance and use.