Title

Lithophilic Fish Populations Increase with Coarser Sediment in Restored Streams

Item Type

Poster

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Session

Poster session

Start Date

26-10-2018 8:00 PM

End Date

26-10-2018 9:59 PM

Keywords

Pennsylvania, stream restoration, precision conservation, stream sediments, fish ecology

Description

Stream restoration projects attempt to improve fish habitat, prevent erosion, and enhance recreational opportunities. Several streams in Montour, Union, and Centre counties have been identified by high resolution topographic and land cover data developed by the Chesapeake Conservancy and are receiving stream restoration. Sampling of fish populations and sediments were performed on both pre-restoration and post-restoration sites through electrofishing and sediment dredging. Fish species were identified, counted, and measured on site. Sediment samples were processed through sieving and a hydrometer analysis to determine grain size from clay to 16-millimeter coarse fragments. A trend was identified between coarser grain size and lithophilic fish populations. These correlations reveal the ecological benefits of stream restoration techniques and serve as a justification to continue with the practice.

Language

eng

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Oct 26th, 8:00 PM Oct 26th, 9:59 PM

Lithophilic Fish Populations Increase with Coarser Sediment in Restored Streams

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Stream restoration projects attempt to improve fish habitat, prevent erosion, and enhance recreational opportunities. Several streams in Montour, Union, and Centre counties have been identified by high resolution topographic and land cover data developed by the Chesapeake Conservancy and are receiving stream restoration. Sampling of fish populations and sediments were performed on both pre-restoration and post-restoration sites through electrofishing and sediment dredging. Fish species were identified, counted, and measured on site. Sediment samples were processed through sieving and a hydrometer analysis to determine grain size from clay to 16-millimeter coarse fragments. A trend was identified between coarser grain size and lithophilic fish populations. These correlations reveal the ecological benefits of stream restoration techniques and serve as a justification to continue with the practice.