Title

Implementing an Ecosystem Services Approach in the Delaware River Basin: Successes, Challenges, and Future Directions

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Room 241

Session

Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecology 2

Start Date

11-11-2017 3:15 PM

End Date

11-11-2017 4:00 PM

Keywords

ecosystem services, resource management, environmental management

Description

The concept of ecosystem services (ES) to define, promote, and conserve natural resources has increased over the past decade. Loosely defined as the benefits that humans gain from the natural environment, the application of ES as a potential management tool is desirable. In theory, ES have the capacity to articulate and leverage key ecological processes, that otherwise may go unnoticed, into environmental policy and management decisions. By extension, this approach serves to justify conservation or restoration actions, and their associated benefits, that may be gained or lost given management intervention. In practice, ES are difficult to implement for three reasons: biophysical (ecosystem process) and societal (value) parameters are difficult to quantify; both vary across time, space, and proximity to human activity; and once parameterized, are difficult to translate to other systems. Here, we use biofiltration of water provisioned by freshwater mussels as a model system to highlight potential opportunities, caveats, and research needs associated with the valuation of natural capital.

Language

eng

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 11th, 3:15 PM Nov 11th, 4:00 PM

Implementing an Ecosystem Services Approach in the Delaware River Basin: Successes, Challenges, and Future Directions

Elaine Langone Center, Room 241

The concept of ecosystem services (ES) to define, promote, and conserve natural resources has increased over the past decade. Loosely defined as the benefits that humans gain from the natural environment, the application of ES as a potential management tool is desirable. In theory, ES have the capacity to articulate and leverage key ecological processes, that otherwise may go unnoticed, into environmental policy and management decisions. By extension, this approach serves to justify conservation or restoration actions, and their associated benefits, that may be gained or lost given management intervention. In practice, ES are difficult to implement for three reasons: biophysical (ecosystem process) and societal (value) parameters are difficult to quantify; both vary across time, space, and proximity to human activity; and once parameterized, are difficult to translate to other systems. Here, we use biofiltration of water provisioned by freshwater mussels as a model system to highlight potential opportunities, caveats, and research needs associated with the valuation of natural capital.