Title

Are Eastern Hellbender Salamanders in the Allegheny River Watershed More Robust and in Healthier Condition Than Those in the Susquehanna River Watershed?

Item Type

Poster

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Session

Poster session

Start Date

10-11-2017 8:00 PM

End Date

10-11-2017 9:59 PM

Keywords

Allegheny River, West Branch Susquehanna River, Eastern hellbender, morphology

Description

Casual observations suggest that individual Eastern Hellbender salamanders from Allegheny River populations are more robust and experience fewer traumatic injuries than those from populations in the Susquehanna River. We compared body mass, total body length, snout-to-vent length, mass/length ratios, and evidence of past or recent injuries for two Eastern Hellbender populations, one from the upper Allegheny River watershed and one from the West Branch Susquehanna River watershed. Mean total body length and snout-to-vent length were significantly larger for the Susquehanna River population. Mean body mass and mass/length ratios were significantly higher for the Allegheny River population. Allegheny River individuals may have experienced fewer traumatic injuries, based on a lower number observable scars, wounds, and bite marks. We conclude that the Allegheny River individuals are smaller in length, but are more robust in body form and in a healthier condition than those from the Susquehanna River. We postulate that the Allegheny River hellbenders may occupy a less stressful environment and have fewer aggressive intraspecific encounters than Susquehanna River hellbenders.

Language

eng

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 10th, 8:00 PM Nov 10th, 9:59 PM

Are Eastern Hellbender Salamanders in the Allegheny River Watershed More Robust and in Healthier Condition Than Those in the Susquehanna River Watershed?

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Casual observations suggest that individual Eastern Hellbender salamanders from Allegheny River populations are more robust and experience fewer traumatic injuries than those from populations in the Susquehanna River. We compared body mass, total body length, snout-to-vent length, mass/length ratios, and evidence of past or recent injuries for two Eastern Hellbender populations, one from the upper Allegheny River watershed and one from the West Branch Susquehanna River watershed. Mean total body length and snout-to-vent length were significantly larger for the Susquehanna River population. Mean body mass and mass/length ratios were significantly higher for the Allegheny River population. Allegheny River individuals may have experienced fewer traumatic injuries, based on a lower number observable scars, wounds, and bite marks. We conclude that the Allegheny River individuals are smaller in length, but are more robust in body form and in a healthier condition than those from the Susquehanna River. We postulate that the Allegheny River hellbenders may occupy a less stressful environment and have fewer aggressive intraspecific encounters than Susquehanna River hellbenders.