Title

Diet Analysis and Microplastic Inspection for Smallmouth Bass Inhabiting the Central Susquehanna River Ecosystem

Item Type

Poster

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Session

Poster session

Start Date

10-11-2017 8:00 PM

End Date

10-11-2017 9:59 PM

Keywords

Susquehanna River, microplastic, diet, smallmouth bass

Description

A diet analysis was performed amongst 84 smallmouth bass (SMB), Micropretus dolomieu diets inhabiting the central portion of the Susquehanna River along with a few major tributaries to exhibit the frequency of occurrence and percent composition by number of organisms present. Following the diet analysis, a wet peroxide procedure was conducted to eradicate all organic matter allowing for the inspection for miniscule, inorganic microfibers collectively known as microplastics. Microplastic pollution and its existence within the diets of aquatic organisms is an escalating concern predicated on the excessive manufacturing of the non-biodegradable material worldwide. Both the diet analysis and wet peroxide procedure were used in the same experiment to realize how microplastic pollution could potentially spread to multiple trophic levels inhabiting the Susquehanna River ecosystem. Because of the piscivorous and insectivorous habits intrinsic to SMB, their diets are not only most applicable to show how microplastic pollution can spread to a variety of trophic levels in their ecosystem, but how microplastic pollution is affecting SMB, the most populous game fish in the Susquehanna River.

Language

eng

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Nov 10th, 8:00 PM Nov 10th, 9:59 PM

Diet Analysis and Microplastic Inspection for Smallmouth Bass Inhabiting the Central Susquehanna River Ecosystem

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

A diet analysis was performed amongst 84 smallmouth bass (SMB), Micropretus dolomieu diets inhabiting the central portion of the Susquehanna River along with a few major tributaries to exhibit the frequency of occurrence and percent composition by number of organisms present. Following the diet analysis, a wet peroxide procedure was conducted to eradicate all organic matter allowing for the inspection for miniscule, inorganic microfibers collectively known as microplastics. Microplastic pollution and its existence within the diets of aquatic organisms is an escalating concern predicated on the excessive manufacturing of the non-biodegradable material worldwide. Both the diet analysis and wet peroxide procedure were used in the same experiment to realize how microplastic pollution could potentially spread to multiple trophic levels inhabiting the Susquehanna River ecosystem. Because of the piscivorous and insectivorous habits intrinsic to SMB, their diets are not only most applicable to show how microplastic pollution can spread to a variety of trophic levels in their ecosystem, but how microplastic pollution is affecting SMB, the most populous game fish in the Susquehanna River.