Title

Bats: the Decline of an Integral Component of Watershed Ecosystems

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Forum

Session

Ecology and Water Quality

Start Date

12-11-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

12-11-2016 4:00 PM

Keywords

bats, white-nose syndrome, endangered species

Description

The decline of biodiversity across the globe has become a central concern in the field of conservation biology. Globally, populations of bats are thought to have declined markedly over the past 50–100 years. Until recently destruction of habitat was likely the largest threat to North American bats. The newest threat to bats―white-nose syndrome―is caused by a fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) that afflicts cave-obligate species during hibernation. White-nose syndrome was first reported in 2007 and has since spread throughout portions of the United States and Canada. Estimates of mortality for hibernating bats two years after infection by the fungus vary from 69% to 98%, depending on locale and species. Riparian and river areas are often considered good habitat for bats, which is likely related to a high density of prey. There are many species of bat, dependent on waterbodies, including the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), which is listed as federally endangered. Management of watersheds, including structural changes to waterways and surface runoff mitigation, is known to have impacts on bat ecology. The drastic decline of bats due to white-nose syndrome makes it more important than ever to consider the interdependent relationship of bats and watersheds.

Language

eng

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Nov 12th, 1:30 PM Nov 12th, 4:00 PM

Bats: the Decline of an Integral Component of Watershed Ecosystems

Elaine Langone Center, Forum

The decline of biodiversity across the globe has become a central concern in the field of conservation biology. Globally, populations of bats are thought to have declined markedly over the past 50–100 years. Until recently destruction of habitat was likely the largest threat to North American bats. The newest threat to bats―white-nose syndrome―is caused by a fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) that afflicts cave-obligate species during hibernation. White-nose syndrome was first reported in 2007 and has since spread throughout portions of the United States and Canada. Estimates of mortality for hibernating bats two years after infection by the fungus vary from 69% to 98%, depending on locale and species. Riparian and river areas are often considered good habitat for bats, which is likely related to a high density of prey. There are many species of bat, dependent on waterbodies, including the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), which is listed as federally endangered. Management of watersheds, including structural changes to waterways and surface runoff mitigation, is known to have impacts on bat ecology. The drastic decline of bats due to white-nose syndrome makes it more important than ever to consider the interdependent relationship of bats and watersheds.