Title

The Power of Partnerships: Using Collaborations with Grass Roots Organizations as an Academic Tool

Item Type

Poster

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Start Date

13-11-2015 8:00 PM

End Date

13-11-2015 9:59 PM

Description

In this case study, Juniata College partnered with the Little Juniata River Association (LJRA) to develop a host of educational opportunities for undergraduates. The partnership was initiated because of an interest in understanding the impact of increased water temperatures on the movement of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in the Little Juniata River. As part of their capstone experience, seniors from the Environmental Science and Studies department met with members of LJRA to design the monitoring protocol using surgically implanted radio transmitters. Students learned how to submit an Institutional Animal Care and Use application, which required them to be certified in the surgical procedure. The training involved practicing first on dead fish and then on live hatchery fish. Members of LJRA caught all of the fish used in the study. We hired undergraduate interns for the summer; they kayaked, walked and drove along the river to track fish movement. They also collected water chemistry data. LJRA members also help with tracking fish. We then collaborated with the Biology department to identify microbial communities along the river. Students were trained in the DNA extraction process. The PCR work was completed by students from the Biology department. The results of the sequencing will allow us to identify the source of different biological contaminants in the stream. To complement the fish study, another team of students have been trained in the Rapid Bioassessment Protocols for Use in Streams and Wadeable Waters. They are assessed a 32 km stretch of this river. Based on our experience so far, we have initiated two more collaborations – working with the Biology department to use genetic material to identify the sex and genetic history of tagged fish; and working with the State hatcheries to design and run an experiment to understand the process and proportion of fish that expel transmitters. Over the last nine months, over 35 undergraduates have worked on various aspects of the project, meeting with grassroots organizations and presenting their findings. This partnership has allowed us to cost effectively reach multiple educational outcomes for dozens of students, training students on stream assessment protocols and ecology, and helping them understanding the role of NGOs in habitat conservation.

Language

eng

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Nov 13th, 8:00 PM Nov 13th, 9:59 PM

The Power of Partnerships: Using Collaborations with Grass Roots Organizations as an Academic Tool

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

In this case study, Juniata College partnered with the Little Juniata River Association (LJRA) to develop a host of educational opportunities for undergraduates. The partnership was initiated because of an interest in understanding the impact of increased water temperatures on the movement of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in the Little Juniata River. As part of their capstone experience, seniors from the Environmental Science and Studies department met with members of LJRA to design the monitoring protocol using surgically implanted radio transmitters. Students learned how to submit an Institutional Animal Care and Use application, which required them to be certified in the surgical procedure. The training involved practicing first on dead fish and then on live hatchery fish. Members of LJRA caught all of the fish used in the study. We hired undergraduate interns for the summer; they kayaked, walked and drove along the river to track fish movement. They also collected water chemistry data. LJRA members also help with tracking fish. We then collaborated with the Biology department to identify microbial communities along the river. Students were trained in the DNA extraction process. The PCR work was completed by students from the Biology department. The results of the sequencing will allow us to identify the source of different biological contaminants in the stream. To complement the fish study, another team of students have been trained in the Rapid Bioassessment Protocols for Use in Streams and Wadeable Waters. They are assessed a 32 km stretch of this river. Based on our experience so far, we have initiated two more collaborations – working with the Biology department to use genetic material to identify the sex and genetic history of tagged fish; and working with the State hatcheries to design and run an experiment to understand the process and proportion of fish that expel transmitters. Over the last nine months, over 35 undergraduates have worked on various aspects of the project, meeting with grassroots organizations and presenting their findings. This partnership has allowed us to cost effectively reach multiple educational outcomes for dozens of students, training students on stream assessment protocols and ecology, and helping them understanding the role of NGOs in habitat conservation.