Title

Susquehanna River Island Vegetation

Item Type

Poster

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Start Date

13-11-2015 8:00 PM

End Date

13-11-2015 10:00 PM

Description

Flood control policies tend to straighten streams and simplify floodplains, reducing habitat diversity and therefore causing loss of biodiversity. Relatively unaffected are islands, many of which are small wildernesses visited occasionally by kayakers and fishermen but otherwise suffering little direct human impact. However, there are almost no published studies of river island vegetation in the Northeast. Here we report on the vegetation of islands on the Susquehanna River and tributaries, in the vicinity of Binghamton, NY. We were particularly interested in the importance of invasive species, the presence or absence of species known to be disappearing in the region, and how urban island vegetation compares with other urban green spaces. Islands tend to lack specialized floodplain habitats such as oxbows, and the native species present tend to be widespread and common. This may not be completely true, however. Compared to other urban green spaces, the proportion of natives is high, unless the island has been occupied by Japanese knotweed. Nonetheless, alien species are always present, despite the lack of human impact. The types of plants present differ somewhat from what is present in “mainland” wetlands. For instance, grasses are less abundant on islands.

Language

eng

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Nov 13th, 8:00 PM Nov 13th, 10:00 PM

Susquehanna River Island Vegetation

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

Flood control policies tend to straighten streams and simplify floodplains, reducing habitat diversity and therefore causing loss of biodiversity. Relatively unaffected are islands, many of which are small wildernesses visited occasionally by kayakers and fishermen but otherwise suffering little direct human impact. However, there are almost no published studies of river island vegetation in the Northeast. Here we report on the vegetation of islands on the Susquehanna River and tributaries, in the vicinity of Binghamton, NY. We were particularly interested in the importance of invasive species, the presence or absence of species known to be disappearing in the region, and how urban island vegetation compares with other urban green spaces. Islands tend to lack specialized floodplain habitats such as oxbows, and the native species present tend to be widespread and common. This may not be completely true, however. Compared to other urban green spaces, the proportion of natives is high, unless the island has been occupied by Japanese knotweed. Nonetheless, alien species are always present, despite the lack of human impact. The types of plants present differ somewhat from what is present in “mainland” wetlands. For instance, grasses are less abundant on islands.