Title

Water Quality of the West Branch Susquehanna River at Watsontown

Start Date

21-11-2014 8:00 PM

End Date

21-11-2014 10:00 PM

Description

The Susquehanna River has faced many changes and challenges in recent years, from flooding, the effects of acid mine drainage, non-point source run-off and point sources such as sewage treatment systems with discharges from combined sewage overflows. This study compares chemical and biological data collected on the river at the Watsontown site from 2009 and 2014 to document any changes to the “health” of the river. The Hilsenhoff Biotic Index was used to calculate benthic macroinvertabrate biodiversity and species tolerance, as insect population and abundance are key to understanding the health of the river. The EPT index was also used to calculate water quality, as were food-web charts of the benthic macroinvertabrates. Water chemistry was also taken and analyzed at the two sites. Since September of 2013, sewage discharge from the primary sewage treatment facility at Watsontown has been eliminated since the plant was removed and replaced by a holding facility which sends the sewage to be treated by the advanced treatment system in Milton. Effects of this change are also included in the study.

Type

Poster

Session

Poster Presentations

Language

eng

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Nov 21st, 8:00 PM Nov 21st, 10:00 PM

Water Quality of the West Branch Susquehanna River at Watsontown

Elaine Langone Center, Terrace Room

The Susquehanna River has faced many changes and challenges in recent years, from flooding, the effects of acid mine drainage, non-point source run-off and point sources such as sewage treatment systems with discharges from combined sewage overflows. This study compares chemical and biological data collected on the river at the Watsontown site from 2009 and 2014 to document any changes to the “health” of the river. The Hilsenhoff Biotic Index was used to calculate benthic macroinvertabrate biodiversity and species tolerance, as insect population and abundance are key to understanding the health of the river. The EPT index was also used to calculate water quality, as were food-web charts of the benthic macroinvertabrates. Water chemistry was also taken and analyzed at the two sites. Since September of 2013, sewage discharge from the primary sewage treatment facility at Watsontown has been eliminated since the plant was removed and replaced by a holding facility which sends the sewage to be treated by the advanced treatment system in Milton. Effects of this change are also included in the study.