Title

Digital Tools and Physical Objects: Connecting Museums, Teaching, and Scholarship through Art History Teaching Resources

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Walls Lounge

Session

#s1a: Reframing Art History Through Digital Approaches, moderator Courtney Paddick

Start Date

29-10-2016 8:30 AM

End Date

29-10-2016 10:00 AM

Description

This presentation will highlight specific entries on the AHTR Weekly blog and in our lesson plan project that have bridged the divide between academic art history, museums, and K-12 classrooms. These include entries on the AHTR Weekly concerning one of the largest Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thons in the country and how the same principles were applied in a classroom, the differences between mentoring for those teaching in museums and those teaching in the university, the connections between lesson plans about the Near East and Islam and contemporary violence committed by ISIS, and the suggestions made by the College Board to revitalize AP art history and how they can be applied to higher education. We will end by discussing how the relationship between AHTR and its recently launched online open access journal, Art History Pedagogy and Practice, can serve as a means of connecting museum education, teaching, and scholarship further by offering a means by which the majority of academic labor, as seen through the lens of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), can be taken seriously in university systems and beyond.

Related

Language

eng

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Oct 29th, 8:30 AM Oct 29th, 10:00 AM

Digital Tools and Physical Objects: Connecting Museums, Teaching, and Scholarship through Art History Teaching Resources

Elaine Langone Center, Walls Lounge

This presentation will highlight specific entries on the AHTR Weekly blog and in our lesson plan project that have bridged the divide between academic art history, museums, and K-12 classrooms. These include entries on the AHTR Weekly concerning one of the largest Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thons in the country and how the same principles were applied in a classroom, the differences between mentoring for those teaching in museums and those teaching in the university, the connections between lesson plans about the Near East and Islam and contemporary violence committed by ISIS, and the suggestions made by the College Board to revitalize AP art history and how they can be applied to higher education. We will end by discussing how the relationship between AHTR and its recently launched online open access journal, Art History Pedagogy and Practice, can serve as a means of connecting museum education, teaching, and scholarship further by offering a means by which the majority of academic labor, as seen through the lens of the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), can be taken seriously in university systems and beyond.