Title

The Know-How and the Know-What: Reflections on the Intersection of Library Science Education and Digital Humanities Initiatives

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone Center, 241

Session

#s3c: Evaluating the role of Digital Scholarship in Higher Education, moderator Thomas Beasley

Start Date

29-10-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

29-10-2016 5:00 PM

Description

Project-based learning, tool-oriented workshops, and graduate assistantships are frequently upheld as a practical approach to integrating LIS graduate students in digital humanities research, but to what degree do these practices prepare students for critical DH engagement? Reflecting on the recent completion of graduate coursework at the Catholic University of America’s MSLIS program, this presentation will provide a personal narrative of library professional education specifically tailored to address areas relevant to the digital humanities: cultural heritage preservation and digital libraries systems and management. By additionally addressing participation in early-stage digital humanities initiatives, the presentation will critically evaluate the relevance of digitally-oriented coursework to actual readiness to support interdisciplinary research in team-based settings. Lastly, the presentation will provide a critical assessment of labor inherent in student participation in project-based learning, crowdsourcing, and research models that integrate graduate labor – paid or otherwise – into the production of digital scholarly work.

Language

eng

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 29th, 3:30 PM Oct 29th, 5:00 PM

The Know-How and the Know-What: Reflections on the Intersection of Library Science Education and Digital Humanities Initiatives

Elaine Langone Center, 241

Project-based learning, tool-oriented workshops, and graduate assistantships are frequently upheld as a practical approach to integrating LIS graduate students in digital humanities research, but to what degree do these practices prepare students for critical DH engagement? Reflecting on the recent completion of graduate coursework at the Catholic University of America’s MSLIS program, this presentation will provide a personal narrative of library professional education specifically tailored to address areas relevant to the digital humanities: cultural heritage preservation and digital libraries systems and management. By additionally addressing participation in early-stage digital humanities initiatives, the presentation will critically evaluate the relevance of digitally-oriented coursework to actual readiness to support interdisciplinary research in team-based settings. Lastly, the presentation will provide a critical assessment of labor inherent in student participation in project-based learning, crowdsourcing, and research models that integrate graduate labor – paid or otherwise – into the production of digital scholarly work.