Title

Digital Humanities Summer Scholars: A Model for Undergraduate Engagement with DH

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone Center, 241

Session

#s2c: Defining Student Success through Digital Scholarship Initiatives, moderator Carrie Pirrman

Start Date

29-10-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

29-10-2017 12:00 PM

Description

In an effort to directly engage undergraduates in the digital humanities, Skillman Library, at Lafayette College, offers a competitive, intensive summer research internship for students interested in digital scholarship. During this six-week program, students create digital research projects of their own, engaging with digital tools, methodologies, and communities of practice. In this panel, we will talk about this model of undergraduate work in DH, the students explaining the process and educational outcomes through their own digital projects. Students in this program learned Python, wrote code, cleaned data, created maps from scratch, performed text analysis, topic modeling, and sound engineering. This program has developed into an incubator for students’ passion projects, and, consequently, a force in elevating undergraduate research and digital humanities at Lafayette. Ultimately, variations on this model could be employed at many kinds of institutions, and we would discuss both advantages and challenges to implementation on the instructor and student levels.

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Language

eng

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Oct 29th, 10:30 AM Oct 29th, 12:00 PM

Digital Humanities Summer Scholars: A Model for Undergraduate Engagement with DH

Elaine Langone Center, 241

In an effort to directly engage undergraduates in the digital humanities, Skillman Library, at Lafayette College, offers a competitive, intensive summer research internship for students interested in digital scholarship. During this six-week program, students create digital research projects of their own, engaging with digital tools, methodologies, and communities of practice. In this panel, we will talk about this model of undergraduate work in DH, the students explaining the process and educational outcomes through their own digital projects. Students in this program learned Python, wrote code, cleaned data, created maps from scratch, performed text analysis, topic modeling, and sound engineering. This program has developed into an incubator for students’ passion projects, and, consequently, a force in elevating undergraduate research and digital humanities at Lafayette. Ultimately, variations on this model could be employed at many kinds of institutions, and we would discuss both advantages and challenges to implementation on the instructor and student levels.