Title

Lessons from History 101: Teaching Digital Humanities at the Introductory Level in Community Colleges

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Center Room

Session

#s2b: Best Practices for Digital Pedagogy, moderator Missy Clapp

Start Date

7-11-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

7-11-2015 12:00 PM

Description

Digital humanities courses often sit at the top of departmental course offerings, focussed on advanced majors or graduate students. In 2014 I reoriented my survey world history two course around digital humanities projects using resources that are free to students. This fall I am reorienting my world history one course in a similar fashion. My experience with these two introductory survey courses, along with my recent NEH Summer Institute on DH in Community Colleges, yields insight into best practices for teaching DH to undergraduates of all levels. Specifically, designing a course for students of diverse backgrounds and preparations requires attention to logistics, learning outcomes, the cognitive science of learning, and an equity-centered andragogy that textbook-centered courses do not.

Language

eng

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Nov 7th, 10:30 AM Nov 7th, 12:00 PM

Lessons from History 101: Teaching Digital Humanities at the Introductory Level in Community Colleges

Elaine Langone Center, Center Room

Digital humanities courses often sit at the top of departmental course offerings, focussed on advanced majors or graduate students. In 2014 I reoriented my survey world history two course around digital humanities projects using resources that are free to students. This fall I am reorienting my world history one course in a similar fashion. My experience with these two introductory survey courses, along with my recent NEH Summer Institute on DH in Community Colleges, yields insight into best practices for teaching DH to undergraduates of all levels. Specifically, designing a course for students of diverse backgrounds and preparations requires attention to logistics, learning outcomes, the cognitive science of learning, and an equity-centered andragogy that textbook-centered courses do not.