Title

Running Wires: Digital History in the Classroom and the Field

Item Type

Presentation

Location

Elaine Langone Center, Walls Lounge

Session

#s1a, moderator Isabella O'Neill

Start Date

6-10-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

6-10-2018 10:30 AM

Keywords

digital humanities, digital history, world war i, first world war, great war, jack peirs, hjc peirs, archives, memory

Description

In the summer of 2015, a team at Gettysburg College formed in order to tell the story of British officer H.J.C. “Jack” Peirs through the letters he wrote home during the First World War. For the last 3 years, our team, with the support of student assistants, has maintained a digital history project that publishes Jack’s letters 100 years to the day they were written. By telling the story of one person, we have helped to humanize a dehumanizing war and raised awareness of all who sacrificed during the Great War. While the project was conceived with pedagogy in mind, it has grown beyond the letters and crossed boundaries: from the analog to the digital, from the classroom to the public, and from the archives to the field. Isherwood, Lucadamo, and Miessler will discuss how the Peirs project has evolved, how it has engaged with the public, and plans for what comes after Armistice Day.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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Language

eng

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Oct 6th, 9:00 AM Oct 6th, 10:30 AM

Running Wires: Digital History in the Classroom and the Field

Elaine Langone Center, Walls Lounge

In the summer of 2015, a team at Gettysburg College formed in order to tell the story of British officer H.J.C. “Jack” Peirs through the letters he wrote home during the First World War. For the last 3 years, our team, with the support of student assistants, has maintained a digital history project that publishes Jack’s letters 100 years to the day they were written. By telling the story of one person, we have helped to humanize a dehumanizing war and raised awareness of all who sacrificed during the Great War. While the project was conceived with pedagogy in mind, it has grown beyond the letters and crossed boundaries: from the analog to the digital, from the classroom to the public, and from the archives to the field. Isherwood, Lucadamo, and Miessler will discuss how the Peirs project has evolved, how it has engaged with the public, and plans for what comes after Armistice Day.