Date of Thesis

5-8-2014

Thesis Type

Honors Thesis

Degree Type

Bachelor of Arts

First Advisor

Chris Boyatzis

Abstract

The present study investigated the relationships between sorority women’s internalization of Greek thin ideals and body image, and dimensions of sorority women’s religiosity and body image. A combined relationship among sorority women’s internalization of Greek thin ideals, body image, and religiosity was also examined. Based on previous research it was expected that women’s internalization of Greek thin ideals would be associated with worse body image (in terms of body shame, body esteem, and drive for thinness) and that women’s religiosity (in terms of secure attachment to God) would be associated with better body image. Combinations of Greek thin ideal internalization and God attachment were expected to significantly predict changes in women’s body image. Women completed a series of survey measures assessing their awareness and internalization of Greek sociocultural thin ideals and their sense of community within their particular sorority. Women also completed a series of survey measures assessing their body shame, body esteem, and drive for thinness, in addition to survey measures assessing dimensions of their religiosity. The study’s findings revealed that women’s internalization of Greek thin ideals was associated with worse body image outcomes and that anxious attachment to God was associated with worse body image outcomes, particularly in relation to body shame. Moderation analyses revealed that Greek thin ideal internalization significantly interacted with anxious God attachment to predict body shame.

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