Date of Thesis

5-5-2013

Thesis Type

Honors Thesis (Bucknell Access Only)

Degree Type

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

T. Joel Wade

Abstract

The present research was conducted in two studies. The first study examined how mating intelligence, self-esteem, and self-perceived attractiveness are related to each other. The second study examined how these three constructs relate to partner choice. It was hypothesized that participants who score high on mating intelligence will also score high on self-esteem and self-perceived attractiveness. Furthermore, those that score high on self-esteem will also score high on self-perceived attractiveness. It was expected that the results would be more significant for women than for men. For the second study, it was hypothesized that participants who score high on all three constructs will be more likely to select the attractive partner. The results did not show a significant interaction between mating intelligence, self-esteem, and self-perceived attractiveness. They also did not indicate higher significance levels for women. However, there were significant effects between the constructs. Additionally, participants with an average or a high score on mating intelligence were more likely to select the attractive partner.

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