Title

UV Responses in Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders and Asians Residing in Hawaiʻi and in Maryland

Publication Date

6-2013

Journal

Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine

Volume

29

Issue

3

First Page

121

Last Page

131

Abstract

Background: UV exposure causes a wide range of skin damage including cutaneous melanoma. The mechanisms of cellular and molecular damage as well as erythemal and pigmentation responses to UV exposure have largely been studied in the White population.

Methods: This study systematically investigates responses to UV exposure in the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) and Asian populations living in Hawai’i (A/HI) as well as in Asians living in Maryland (A/MD).

Results: Our analyses indicate that the NHPI population is less sensitive to UV exposure than the A/HI population. Comparisons between the two Asian groups suggest that, despite slightly but not statistically different baseline constitutive pigmentation (pre-UV exposure), the A/HI and A/MD had similar UV sensitivity, measured as minimal erythemal dose (MED). However, the A/MD population had higher levels of oxy-hemoglobin at doses of 2.0, 2.8 and 4.0 MED. Unexpectedly the A/MD subjects retained higher levels of pigmentation 2 weeks post UV exposure.

Conclusion: This study provides insight into UV responses of the inhabitants of Hawai’i and shows that such responses are statistically significant for relatively small samples of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders, and for Asians living in Hawai’i and Asians living in Maryland.

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