Title

Virginia Woolf Miscellany, "1930s Woolf"

Publication Date

Spring 2015

Journal

Virginia Woolf Miscellay

Volume

Spring/Summer 2015

Issue

Number 87

First Page

1

Last Page

3

Abstract

The literature of the 1930s, commonly characterized as anti-modernist because of the prevalence of documentary realism, political purpose, and autobiographically-inflected fiction, bears witness to Woolf’s most daring (The Waves) and most commercially successful (The Years) novels. This issue of VWM seeks contributions that explore Woolf’s relationship to the canonical literature of the 1930s, such as but not limited to Auden’s poetry, Isherwood’s Berlin fiction, Auden’s and Isherwood’s plays, Spender’s commentary, and Waugh’s comedic novels. In addition, this issue encourages responses to the following questions: How does Woolf scholarship, if at all, engage with the critical study of 1930s literature? How does Woolf’s modernism disrupt or complement the critical understanding of 1930s literature? What can Woolf’s late fiction and essays reveal about the 1930s and its literature that the common scholarly narrative conceals or overlooks?

Comments

Erica Gene Delsandro, guest editor of Virginia Woolf Miscellany, "1930s Woolf"

Department

Women's & Gender Studies